Blame

“When we blame, we give away our power.”
-Greg Anderson

I like this quote about blame because it really captures the essence of how I feel about the subject. I believe that so much of what is wrong in the world right now has to do with blame. I think one of the issues that keeps racism alive is that it is a lot easier to point the fingers at others for our problems instead of being personally accountable for them.
As a controlling person I have a hard time dealing with a lot of situations. Throughout the years I have gotten a lot better at dealing with things but it has taken a lot of effort. The serenity prayer helps, but at times it is hard to apply. I take it a step further and think about reaction. How I let myself react to a situation will always affect the outcome of the situation at an internal emotional level.

We cannot control others actions, feelings or thoughts. The more we try, the worse our interpersonal relationships become. It gets even trickier when we fool ourselves into thinking that we can actually predict other people’s behavior. While we might think we know someone really good, we are not inside them and we cannot predict how a person is always going to think or act. Even if we can we should not, I think this is one of the things that stops change from going forward. People go back to their old ways because there is always that expectation of how they have always acted. Predisposition is powerful enough to make situation go in a direction it should.

Racism is fueled in part by prejudice; it is not always fueled by pure ignorance. It is a learned behavior that comes from those close to us. It comes from our environment and society overall. I have had the opportunity to grow up in a country where racism exists but it is a different kind of racism. I know that racism is a learned behavior because I have seen many different faces of it. While there is something to say about fear of those things we are not familiar with and instinct, diversity it is not necessarily the solution to racism. I never felt discriminated against race wise while I lived in Colombia, but I have felt it many times since I lived in the U.S.

Are people less racist in Colombia? Not necessarily, but the behaviors learned over there a lot different than they are in the U.S. One of the most comical difference between the two countries comes from a simple saying. “I worked like a black man” in Colombia, means you had to work really hard that day. The same sentence in the U.S. would instantly be considered racist and would not be understood.

Chicago and Midland are far apart in the racist level. Believe it or not I have felt less discriminated in a small town in America than in the big city. I have also felt a lot of racism from my own race. Dating outside my race has always been an issue for people in my own race. Racism is one of societies sickness and unless we all acknowledge it, it is never going to get better. At the same time we have to be very careful diagnosing it, because I believe there are plenty of hypochondria running out there calling racism things that are not.

“Pulling the race card” has become a cliché. It is sad that it minimizes real struggle because it makes a blanket statement of something that is a real problem and puts it right next to fear. Fear fuels a lot of the perception of racism. When you feel discriminated against you are guessing what someone else is thinking about you, and while most of the time you might be right, statistically you cannot be always right. Not every single person of a different race is going to hate you because of the color of your skin. When you constantly feel prosecuted, you develop a kind of social paranoia that makes you even more racist in my opinion than anyone around you.

I believe that oppression does exist, but the only people that can do anything to change it are the oppressed ones. They need to break the chains that bind them and I believe one of them is blame. When you blame others for your problems you are empowering them to continue their behavior. You are the only capable of changing the situation. You have control over how you look at every situation. You are the one to blame.

5 Responses to Blame

  1. Pues yo digo que es tu culpa Logtar! :P
    Todo bien.

  2. The topic of racism, ooo, one of my favorite topics . . . and you picked it yet again, me likes. Okay, so here’s some commentary in response to some interesting phrases in this entry:

    Pulling the race card” has become a cliché. It is sad that it minimizes real struggle because it makes a blanket statement of something that is a real problem and puts it right next to fear.

    I loved that statement, because it is so true. I recently sent a comment a week and a half ago to someone and I felt the same way you do.

    I think one of the issues that keeps racism alive is that it is a lot easier to point the fingers at others for our problems instead of being personally accountable for them.

    What keeps racism alive is the fact that racist ideologies are perpetuated in society by those in power. It is not the fault of the person who is racially discriminated; in fact, a person who is racially discriminated should get angry. Those in power want people to internalize and swallow racism, but the truth is, is that when a person accepts the racism and does not react, they actually end up letting the oppressor think it is okay to ridicule them, and that they can get away with it . . . and once they get angry about it, and we racial minorities complain, they say that we pull the “race card”, lousy bastards, all of them.

    I believe that oppression does exist, but the only people that can do anything to change it are the oppressed ones.

    Now here is where you are flat out wrong John. Historically, it has been those in power who majorly need to create the change. Think about the civil rights movement. The founder of the NAACP was a white woman named Mary White Ovington, and like many other whites, she knew that what her fellow white brothers and sisters were doing was wrong, and she wanted to convince them that it was wrong, so she essentially got on their cases about it. It took sympathy from the those in power to create change. Another way to create change is if those in power feel a sharp amount of pain in their communities, for example, the Depression. During the depression, 40% of the country was out of work, and it affected a lot of white folks, hence the initiation of Social Security, etc. Those who have little power cannot simply pull themselves out of their bootstraps John. If that was the case, we would have never had slavery in our country.

  3. I think one of the issues that keeps racism alive is that it is a lot easier to point the fingers at others for our problems instead of being personally accountable for them.

    Oh, and one more thing I wanted to mention about this phrase, is that when we internalize racism, we experience severe psychological trauma . . . paranoia is a manifestation of this.

    If we are to push for personal responsibility, then the only way this will happen, is if those in power in the U.S. feel a strong compassion for those who are discriminated against, and fight against others who do not share their sympathy or work hard to get them to feel what they feel, which is that times must change, and that racism must end.

  4. Is that Greg Anderson the mathematician?

  5. No I think the Author is the one that said the quote.

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